120 mentoring sessions in!

By Sam Forsdike | January 28 2019

120 mentoring sessions in!

Blog Category: General updateBlog Tags: Education and Education

  • Profile

    Our Employment Support Pathway operates by using trained mentors from the local business community to share their skills to support users of our Jobs Club with their individual employment goals.

    Mentoring is a crucial part of our success. The 1-2-1 nature of working is both intensive and personal. Mentees enjoy having someone external, often related to their field of interest, to help navigate them through the steps required to achieve their goals. Mentoring is structured, with clear goals, but it is always lovely to see friendships develop over the course of the time in which people are working together. Especially when their are achievements to celebrate together! In the last couple of weeks we have seen a young gentleman keen on pursuing a career in design gain a work placement at Ted Baker, a refugee enrol at college to study English and Maths which he will need for his ambition to become a nurse and an asylum seeker, who was a tailor back in Iran, use his skills to volunteer at a charity providing interview clothes to those unable to afford them for themselves.

    Last season, we ran 113 mentoring sessions. This season, at the halfway point, we have already facilitated 120+ sessions. This is a testament both to the sad state of affairs that means our Jobs Club is more in demand than ever before and to the effectiveness of mentoring in which our mentees turn up week after week to sit with their mentors and plot their way into work, training and education.

    A huge thank-you to all our mentors who have helped out this year from ASOS, Wellcome, Getty Images, Zenith Media, Network Rail, Skanska, Debenhams, Atkins and Accenture. We feel hugely honoured to have such dedicated and compassionate volunteers who provide smiles, help grow confidence and support their mentees through every step along the way.

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WRITTEN BY

Sam Forsdike